Toolkit Resources

Vote: 

Student Learning Outcomes

Some institutions have created broad learning outcomes for all students that include a global focus. Here are a few examples from AAC&U member institutions.

Butler University

Carnegie Classification: Master's Colleges & Universities: Larger Programs

California State University Long Beach

Carnegie Classification: Master's Colleges & Universities: Larger Programs

Central College

Carnegie Classification: Baccalaureate Colleges: Arts & Sciences Focus

College of Wooster

Carnegie Classification: Baccalaureate Colleges: Arts & Sciences Focus

Delaware State

Carnegie Classification: Master's Colleges & Universities: Medium Programs

Drury University

Carnegie Classification: Master's Colleges & Universities: Medium Programs

John Carroll University

Carnegie Classification: Master's Colleges & Universities: Larger Programs

Keene State College

Carnegie Classification: Master's Colleges & Universities: Small Programs

Kennesaw State University

Carnegie Classification: Doctoral Universities: Moderate Research Activity

Mesa Community College

Carnegie Classification: Associate's Colleges: High Transfer-Mixed Traditional/Nontraditional

Michigan State University

Carnegie Classification: Doctoral Universities: Highest Research Activity

Otterbein College

Carnegie Classification: Master's Colleges & Universities: Medium Programs

St. Lawrence University

Carnegie Classification: Baccalaureate Colleges: Arts & Sciences Focus

St. Edward's University

Carnegie Classification: Master's Colleges & Universities: Larger Programs

San Jose State

Carnegie Classification: Master's Colleges & Universities: Larger Programs

United States Military Academy

Carnegie Classification: Baccalaureate Colleges: Arts & Sciences Focus

Utah Valley University

Carnegie Classification: Master's Colleges & Universities: Small Programs 

 

Butler University

By graduation, Butler's dynamic academic and co-curricular offerings will prepare our students to demonstrate the following:

  • Liberal arts knowledge and transferable skills developed through multifaceted learning experiences
  • Disciplinary and professional knowledge and skills in at least one academic field of study
  • Competencies that facilitate their personal development and wellness cultivated through experiences inside and outside the classroom
  • A capacity to help shape our local and global communities through civic understanding and an appreciation of diverse perspectives

https://www.butler.edu/student-outcomes

 

California State University Long Beach

Graduates will be:
• Well-prepared with communication, numeracy and critical thinking skills to successfully join the workforce of California and the world or to pursue advanced study;
• Critically and ethically engaged in global and local issues;
• Knowledgeable and respectful of the diversity of individuals, groups, and cultures;
• Accomplished at integrating the skills of a liberal education with disciplinary or professional competency;
• Skilled in collaborative problem-solving, research, and creative activity.

http://web.csulb.edu/divisions/aa/assessment/institutional_objective.html

 

Central College

Seven Learning Goals:
• To develop well-being: emotionally; physically; psychologically; socially; and spiritually.
• To cultivate habits for life-long learning.
• To engage in focused intellectual pursuits in preparation for life’s work.
• To develop practical competencies in preparation for life’s work.
• To learn and foster habits of sustainability.
• To develop competencies for responsible global citizenship.
• To comprehend, foster and exercise the power of creativity.

 

College of Wooster

 

  • A liberal arts education should be rich in content and intellectually rigorous, to engage the minds and the imagination of students and faculty alike. It should enable students to respond critically and creatively to the range of human inquiry into the nature of the physical world, society, and the human self, and to share their ideas orally, in writing and through the forms of artistic expression.
  • A liberal arts education should help students to appreciate the nature of the academic disciplines-as intellectual tools that enable us to think in structured and systematic ways, and for the depth of inquiry they allow. By study in a number of disciplines, students should come to understand the different ways of knowing that are embodied in the disciplines, and by coming to know at least one discipline in depth, students should equip themselves to become scholars engaged in the creation of knowledge. By reflecting on connections among the disciplines, students should appreciate how the understanding of a subject they may be enlarged by different disciplinary approaches, how different kinds of knowledge are interrelated, and how work in one field is affected by developments in others.
  • A liberal arts education should prepare students for lives of responsibility in a pluralistic society and instill a breadth of understanding, concern, and commitment. It should provide opportunities to examine values, to reflect upon the richness and diversity of human experience, and to develop the necessary skills to contribute to the discussion of contemporary issues and to communicate effectively to individuals and across cultural differences.

https://www.wooster.edu/_media/files/academics/affairs/resources/wooster-education.pdf

 

Delaware State

1.  Reading, Speaking, Listening
College graduates should be able to communicate effectively. Students should be able to do the following: comprehend, analyze, interpret and evaluate various texts; write and speak effectively and correctly; listen actively to what instructors and peers are saying. Communicating effectively is not the exclusive domain of the English Department. It is the responsibility of all instructors to inculcate effective communication skills throughout the general education and major curriculum.
 

2. Self-evaluation
In order to become productive and contributing citizens, students must have a critical self-understanding. Active engagement of students in their education is important. This creates a sense of relevance. Students can also develop an internal locus of control and other mature ways of thinking. Self-evaluation is evident in curricular and co-curricular activities, journal reflections and course activities that encourage students to examine their ethics, core beliefs/values, communication and leadership skills, strengths, weaknesses, likes/dislikes, etc. Students can then be prepared to make choices in majors, minors, career aspirations and important life decisions.
 

3. Wellness
To be able to think clearly, develop effective study skills, and be prepared for careers and life-long learning, students must demonstrate an understanding of the principles involved in wellness.  They should be able to share these principles with family members, friends, and associates.  The wellness component aims to address issues involved in nutrition, well-being, social adjustment, and psychological and physical health.
 

4. Information Literacy 
In order to be successful in this information age, all graduates should have knowledge/experience in the process of information acquisition.  This includes researching library databases, understanding and performing scholarly searches, completing citations, evaluating information for relevance/reliability, and compiling information for a unified purpose.  Information literacy must be incorporated in general education courses as well as major courses to demonstrate field-specific applications.
 

5. Computer Competency
To the greatest extent possible and wherever practical, computer and information technologies should be integrated into general education courses and generally throughout the curriculum. College graduates should be able to do the following: (a) use computers and other technology (b) access and manipulate spreadsheets and databases; (c) use printed and computerized resources to locate information; and (d) use and prepare multimedia applications. Students needing formal instruction in this area should takes courses such as Applying Computers (20-101) and Microcomputer Applications (52-105). These and other program specific courses provide students with opportunities to analyze the efficient utilization of computers to enhance productivity at all levels of organization, from office personnel to executive management. Students examine and utilize the different types of hardware, software, operating systems, multimedia, the Internet, Web page design, etc.
 

6. Writing in the Major 
College graduates should be able to write coherent essays, reports, thesis papers, using the standard form of the English language that is relatively free from grammatical, mechanical, and usage errors.  To build on the foundational English composition skills, students will be required to apply these writing skills in their field of study as well as across the general education program.
 
7. Quantitative Reasoning 
This competency may be met by courses or modules in the major or by a second mathematics course. Some examples of quantitative reasoning include:
• Mathematical analysis, computations, charting, graphing, algebraic problem solving,
• Numerical analysis, numerical relationships, patterns, estimation measurement
• Quantitative problem solving or real-world problem solving
• Data analysis, data interpretation, statistical analysis
• Logical thinking and steps to construct feasible solutions to various problems.
The specific methods of quantitative analysis will vary by program.
 

8. African-American Experience
Delaware State University’s legacy as a historically black college enables it to provide students with the opportunity to understand African-American perspectives in history, liberal arts, and society. Courses such as African-American History, African-American Art History, African-American Literature, African-American Music and other major courses provide exposure to the African-American viewpoints in American society.  Students will demonstrate an understanding of the roots of slavery and resulting African-American experiences, as well as an appreciation of the contributions of African Americans.
 

9. Multiculturalism
College graduates must understand how to develop and manage human relationships by being able to identify and adapt to the needs, values, expectations, and sensibilities of others. Students must be able to do the following: (a) understand and consider diverse points of view; (b) determine what is appropriate in a given situation given the norms of groups and cultures which provide guidance for acceptable language and behavior; (c) be open-minded about and inclusive of other cultures; and (d) understand different points of view based on gender, ethnicity, race, or national origin.
 

10. Critical thinking / Problem-solving
College graduates should be able to move beyond the mere conveying or restating of other's facts and ideas. Students should be able to do the following: (a) reflect upon, question, analyze, and evaluate information; (b) assess bias, narrowness and contradictions; (c) formulate hypotheses and alternatives; (d) evaluate an argument in terms of reasoning and applicability; (e) determine how new data may lead to confirmation or questioning of conclusions; (f) make inferences, comparisons, formulate frameworks or categories, classify data, and translate information from one medium to another; and (g) analyze and evaluate their own arguments and those of others in order to confirm or deny the accuracy, validity, and reliability of their own reasoning and of the various sources of information they hear or read.
Students should also be able to conduct disciplined inquiry and be able to do the following: (a) determine the nature of a problem; (b) analyze the problem and determine possible solutions; (c) assess the advantages and disadvantages of each possible solution; (d) determine the most effective and efficient of the optional solutions; and (e) execute the solution. Being able to think critically and solve problems is one of the hallmarks of becoming an educated person.
 

11. Global Issues
College graduates should understand that their world is no longer circumscribed by the boundaries of nations and continents. The world is a global community and students should understand and appreciate the pluralism of this global community. Students should be able to demonstrate an understanding of various political and economic systems, and the positive and negative aspects of globalization.

https://www.desu.edu/academics/university-college/uc-services/general-education

 

Drury University

• Engagement with Global Challenges
In the Engaging Our World curriculum, students develop the ability to identify and address the major issues confronting today’s world. Students take an interdisciplinary global studies course (CORE 201) addressing an important global issue, and 6 credits of foreign language. Additionally, global learning is infused across the campus, with all departments offering courses that present disciplinary content situated in a global context. This cross-disciplinary infusion exemplifies AAC&U’s recommendation that global learning should move “to a broader framework that shapes all, or significant parts, of the general education curriculum.”
• Engagement with Communities
The Engaging Our World curriculum requires students to complete two engaged learning experiences. Powerful evidence shows that high impact learning practices, such as service learning, internships, study away/abroad, leadership development and student/faculty research, stimulate gains in critical thinking skills, civic and global awareness, and commitment to intellectual success. The new curriculum integrates these practices into general education in a systematic and intentional way.
• Engagement with Diverse Methods, Approaches and Areas of Knowledge
The Engaging Our World curriculum exposes students to a broad range of knowledge in two central ways. First, students enroll in a thematic First-Year Experience seminar (CORE 101) that combines the development of key academic skills with an exploration of important and interesting topics, taught by faculty with expertise in these areas. Second, students take at least six credit hours the fine arts, humanities, social sciences, and natural and mathematical sciences, in courses carefully designed to develop understanding of that discipline’s a distinct way of understanding, interpreting, or studying the world.
• Engagement with Core Skills Necessary for Professional Success, Lifelong Learning, and Ethical Participation in the Global Community
The Engaging Our World curriculum recognizes that meaningful engagement with the world requires key skills. Development of writing, oral communication and critical thinking—begins in the thematic CORE 101 seminar and continues in the 3-credit Drury Foundations course. To assure mastery of more advanced writing, students also develop proficiency as writers in their major. Students learn the skills for success in and beyond college through personalized advising and mentorship in CORE 103/104. Kinesthetic and wellness skills are developed and cultivated through the EXSP 220 Personal Wellness course. The capacity for sound moral judgment is developed in the junior-level Ethics seminar course.

Through these four modes—Engagement with Global Challenges, Engagement with Communities, Engagement with Diverse Ways of Knowing, and Engagement with Core Skills— the Engaging Our World curriculum provides Drury students with a robust liberal arts general education that will prepare them for professional careers, engaged citizenship, and a life of learning.

http://www.drury.edu/core/about-drury-core

 

John Carroll University

We expect that JCU graduates will be able to:
• Demonstrate an integrative knowledge of human and natural worlds
• Develop habits of critical analysis and aesthetic appreciation
• Apply creative and innovative thinking
• Communicate skillfully in multiple forms of expression
• Act competently in a global and diverse world
• Understand and promote social justice
• Apply a framework for examining ethical dilemmas
• Employ leadership and collaborative skills
• Understand the religious dimensions of human experience.

http://sites.jcu.edu/results/pages/learning-outcomes/

 

Keene State College

Critical Thinking:

Keene State College students will evaluate evidence, consider multiple perspectives, choose and defend a position from several alternatives, and analyze complex problems.
Creative Inquiry:
Keene State College students will engage in research, scholarly activity or creative work to contribute new knowledge, art or expression and reflect on the process of inquiry or self-expression.
 

Intercultural Competence:
Keene State College students will reflect critically on their own culture and on the intersectionality of culture and social location, demonstrate knowledge of a diversity of cultures, and communicate effectively with people from a variety of backgrounds.
 

Civic Engagement:
Keene State College students will demonstrate knowledge of one or more social or environmental issues including relevant cultural, political and policy contexts; take action individually or collectively to address issues; and reflect on the ethical dimensions of civic engagement.

Commitment to Well-Being:
Keene State College students will reflect critically on their own well-being and that of the larger world, demonstrate knowledge of issues that impact health and wellness, advocate for themselves, and commit to one or more practices that promote well-being.

http://www.keene.edu/academics/liberal-arts/outcomes/

 

Kennesaw State University

Written Communication: Students will write & communicate at a college level in various modes, media, and/or rhetorical contexts.

Reading Comprehension: Students will demonstrate an ability to comprehend, analyze, & interpret texts in various modes, genres, media, and/or contexts.

Math Skills: Students will demonstrate the ability to explain information presented in mathematical forms (e.g., equations, graphs, diagrams, tables) and/or convert information into mathematical forms at a level appropriate for the complexity of problems in a college -level course.

Critical Thinking: Students will evaluate and synthesize information to support ideas and perspectives.

Critical Thinking Overlay: Students will articulate a position on an issue and support it by evaluating evidence relevant to the position, considering opposing positions or evidence, and evaluating the implications and/or consequences of this issue.

Literature: Students will analyze and interpret texts and other creative works from multiple cultures and perspectives.

Global Perspectives Overlay: Students will analyze creative works from multiple international cultures in relation to the historical, political, economic, sociocultural, aesthetic, or personal contexts in which those works emerged.

Applied Math: Students will demonstrate an ability to effectively apply symbolic representations to model and solve problems.

Natural Sciences: Students will demonstrate an understanding of college
-level scientific principles, theories, and laws, and apply them to solve problems and explore natural phenomena.

U.S. Perspectives: Students will demonstrate a broad understanding of history, political systems, or culture of the U.S.

Social Sciences: Students analyze the complexity of how historical, economic, and political relationships develop, persist, or change.

http://curriculum.kennesaw.edu/docs/gened/general-education-program-description-and-los-1-2.pdf

 

Mesa Community College

COMMUNICATION
Institutional Learning Outcome: Purposeful development, expression, or reception of a message through oral, written, or non-verbal means
CIVIC ENGAGEMENT
Institutional learning Outcome: Encompasses actions to pro-mote the quality of life in a community, through both political and non-political processes.

CRITICAL THINKING
Institutional Learning Outcome: The mental process of effectively identifying, determining, gathering, evaluating, and utilizing resources to innovate and/or to accomplish a specific task.

CULTURAL AND GLOBAL ENGAGEMENT
Institutional learning Outcome: Encompasses the awareness of cultural systems, events, and creations and an ability to apply this cultural and global awareness to human interaction and expression.

https://www.mesacc.edu/community-civic-engagement/our-purpose/student-learning-outcomes

 

Michigan State University

Analytical Thinking
The MSU graduate uses ways of knowing from mathematics, natural sciences, social sciences, humanities, and arts to access information and critically analyzes complex material in order to evaluate evidence, construct reasoned arguments, and communicate inferences and conclusions.
• Acquires, analyzes, and evaluates information from multiple sources.
• Synthesizes and applies the information within and across disciplines.
• Identifies and applies, as appropriate, quantitative methods for defining and responding to problems.
• Identifies the credibility, use and misuse of scientific, humanistic and artistic methods.

Cultural Understanding
The MSU graduate comprehends global and cultural diversity within historical, artistic, and societal contexts.
• Reflects on experiences with diversity to demonstrate knowledge and sensitivity.
• Demonstrates awareness of how diversity emerges within and across cultures.

Effective Citizenship
The MSU graduate participates as a member of local, national, and global communities and has the capacity to lead in an increasingly interdependent world.
• Understands the structures of local, national, and global governance systems and acts effectively within those structures in both individual and collaborative ways.
• Applies knowledge and abilities to solve societal problems in ethical ways.

Effective Communication
The MSU graduate uses a variety of media to communicate effectively with diverse audiences.
• Identifies how contexts affect communication strategies and practices.
• Engages in effective communication practices in a variety of situations and with a variety of media.

Integrated Reasoning
The MSU graduate integrates discipline-based knowledge to make informed decisions that reflect humane social, ethical, and aesthetic values.
• Critically applies liberal arts knowledge in disciplinary contexts and disciplinary knowledge in liberal arts contexts.

• Uses a variety of inquiry strategies incorporating multiple views to make value judgments, solve problems, answer questions, and generate new understandings.

http://undergrad.msu.edu/programs/learninggoals

 

Otterbein College

Knowledgeable- Otterbein undergraduate students will acquire a deep knowledge of, and appreciation for, their chosen major(s) as well as a solid grounding in a broad range of disciplines in the liberal arts and sciences.

Multi-Literate- Otterbein undergraduate students will develop and demonstrate a range of intellectual and practical skills, including written and oral communication skills; research skills; quantitative, technological, visual, and information literacies.

Engaged - Otterbein undergraduate students will become intellectually, aesthetically, and civically engaged. As intellectually engaged people, they will integrate, synthesize, critically reflect upon, and evaluate what they know. As aesthetically engaged people, they will value and practice the art of imagination and creative expression. As civically engaged people, they will be prepared to confront, act upon, and lead collaborative responses to increasingly complex challenges in diverse local, national, and global communities.

Responsible - Otterbein undergraduate students will make choices that promote their own well-being and that of others. Encouraged to grapple with diverse value systems, they will move toward ethical commitments that reflect a sense of agency, honesty, and fairness.

Inquisitive - Otterbein undergraduate students will know how to learn. As confident life-long learners, they will be curious and eager to discover more about themselves and the natural, cultural, and social worlds.

http://www.otterbein.edu/docs/default-source/files/academic-affairs/kmeri-learning-outcomes.pdf?sfvrsn=0

 

St. Lawrence University

1. an ability to speak  and write clearly, articulately, and persuasively;
2. an ability to acquire, evaluate, and communicate information;
3. an ability to analyze and resolve complex problems, both independently and collaboratively;
4. an ability to reason quantitatively, logically, and/or symbolically;
5. an ability to integrate knowledge from multiple perspectives;
6. an ability to critique and/or create artistic works;
7. a knowledge of the complexity and diversity of the human experience;
8. a knowledge of the complexity and diversity of the natural world, and
9. a depth of understanding in at least one field.

http://www.stlawu.edu/assessment/curriculum

 

St. Edward’s University

University Essential Learning Outcomes:

St. Edward’s University students will develop their abilities to synthesize and apply learning to effect positive change in personal, local, and global contexts through the continued acquisition of:

• Knowledge of Liberal Arts and Sciences
o Demonstrate competence in a specific discipline.
o Integrate a broad liberal arts and sciences perspective within the discipline.
o Articulate the roles of liberal arts and sciences in society.

• Intellectual and Applied Sciences
o Communicate effectively through oral, written, and visual forms.
o Demonstrate information, quantitative, and visual literacies in a variety of contexts.
o Use critical, creative, and collaborative thinking to solve problems and achieve common goals.

• Personal and Social Responsibility
o Develop skills to maintain mental and physical wellness.
o Identify and analyze one’s own spiritual and cultural perspectives and demonstrate respect for others’ views and values.
o Integrate global perspectives and moral reasoning to make personal and professional decisions in pursuit of social justice.

https://sites.stedwards.edu/seugened/essential-learning-outcomes/

 

San Jose State

University Learning Goals

 
Specialized Knowledge
Mastered the depth of knowledge required for a degree, as identified by its program learning outcomes.
 

Broad Integrative Knowledge
Mastery in each step of an investigative, creative or practical project (i.e. brainstorming, planning, formulating hypotheses or complex questions, designing, creating, completing, and communicating).
An understanding of the implications of results or findings from a particular work in a societal context (i.e. social or economic implications of a scientific finding).
Students graduating with a baccalaureate degree will have demonstrated an understanding of critical components of broad academic areas, the arts, humanities, social sciences, and sciences and their integration.
 

Intellectual Skills
Fluency in the use of specific theories, tools, technology and graphical representation.
Skills and abilities necessary for life-long learning: critical and creative thinking, effective communication, conscientious information gathering and processing, mastery of quantitative methodologies, and the ability to engage effectively in collaborative activities.
 

Applied Knowledge
The ability to integrate theory, practice, and problem-solving to address practical issues.
The ability to apply their knowledge and skills to new settings or in addressing complex problems.
The ability to work productively as individuals and in groups.
 

Social and Global Responsibilities
The ability to act intentionally and ethically to address a global or local problem in an informed manner with a multicultural and historical perspective and a clear understanding of societal and civic responsibilities.
 

Diverse and global perspectives through engagement with the multidimensional SJSU community.

http://www.sjsu.edu/learninggoals/university/

 

 

United States Military Academy

The overarching Academic Program goal is graduates integrate knowledge and skills from a variety of disciplines to anticipate and respond appropriately to opportunities and challenges in a changing world. The seven Academic Program goals are as follows:

 

Communication: Graduates communicate effectively with all audiences.
1. Listen actively, read critically, and develop an informed understanding of the
communications of others.
2. Speak and write using Standard American English.
3. Effectively convey meaningful information to diverse audiences using appropriate forms and media.
4. Communicate in a foreign language.
5. Use sound logic and relevant evidence to make convincing arguments.

Critical Thinking and Creativity: Graduates think critically and creatively.
1. Identify the essential aspects of a situation and ask relevant questions.
2. Integrate knowledge and skills from a variety of disciplines.
3. Make meaningful connections and distinctions among diverse experiences and concepts.
4. Reason both quantitatively and qualitatively.
5. Think innovatively and accept risk to pursue solutions in the face of ambiguity.
6. Value reflection and creativity; envision possibilities.

Lifelong Learning: Graduates demonstrate the capability and desire to pursue progressive and continued intellectual development.
1. Demonstrate the willingness and ability to learn independently.
2. Engage successfully in deliberate self-directed and collaborative learning experiences.
3. Pursue self-awareness and embrace the responsibility for personal intellectual development.
4. Pursue knowledge in areas of personal or professional interest.

Ethical Reasoning: Graduates recognize ethical issues and apply ethical perspectives and concepts in decision making.
1. Understand the intellectual foundations of ethical principles.
2. Recognize ethical components of problems and situations.
3. Examine and evaluate different ethical perspectives, principles, and concepts in context.
4. Apply ethical perspectives and concepts in solving complex problems, including those found in military settings

Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics: Graduates apply science, technology, engineering, and mathematics concepts and processes to solve complex problems.
1. Apply mathematics, science, and computing
to model devices, systems, processes, or behaviors.
2. Apply the scientific method.
3. Collect and analyze data in support of decision making.
4. Apply an engineering design process to create effective and adaptable solutions.
5. Understand and use information technology appropriately, adaptively, and securely.

Humanities and Social Sciences: Graduates apply concepts from the humanities and social sciences to understand and analyze the human condition.
1. Understand, analyze, and know how to influence human behavior.
2. Analyze the history, diversity, complexity, and interaction of cultures.
3. Analyze political, legal, military, and economic influences on social systems.
4. Engage in and reflect on cross cultural experiences.
5. Integrate the methodologies of the humanities and social sciences in decision-making.

Disciplinary Depth: Graduates integrate and apply knowledge and methodological approaches gained through in‐depth study of an academic
discipline
1. Apply disciplinary tools, methods of inquiry, and theoretical approaches.
2. Identify and explain representative questions and arguments of their chosen disciplines.
3. Recognize limits of a discipline as well as areas in which it contributes to intellectual inquiry and problem solving.
4. Synthesize knowledge and concepts from across their chosen disciplines.
5. Contribute disciplinary knowledge and skills as a part of a collaborative effort engaging
challenges that span multiple disciplines.

http://www.usma.edu/strategic/siteassets/sitepages/home/approved%20academic%20program%20goals%202013-04-25.pdf

 

Utah Valley University

Integrative and Applied Learning:
A student will engage in discipline-appropriate experiences with the academic and broader community through integrated and applied learning.

Intellectual and Practical Skills Foundation:
A student will acquire a foundation of intellectual and practical skills including communication, quantitative reasoning, qualitative reasoning (critical, analytical, and creative thinking), and technical and information literacies.

People of Integrity:
A student will become personally and socially responsible by acquiring, developing and demonstrating skills in ethical reasoning and understanding.

Professional Competency:
A student will demonstrate professional competence by meeting the established standards of the discipline, working as a valued member of a team, effectively formulating and solving problems, and actively seeking and honing lifelong learning skills.

Stewards of Place:
A student will demonstrate stewardship of local, national, and global communities by cultivating awareness of: interdependence among those communities;
issues within those communities; and organizations and skills that address such issues.

Knowledge Foundation: A student will demonstrate knowledge of human cultures and the physical and natural world in the following areas of essential study: arts, history,
humanities, languages, science and mathematics, social sciences. Knowledge Foundation refers to GE Distribution courses and other courses and experiences within the major.

 

https://www.uvu.edu/catalog/current/policies-requirements/essential-learning-outcomes.html