Liberal Education, Summer 2001

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Summer2001Vol.87No.3

Expanding the Horizon of Liberal Education

Liberal arts education has both economic and educational meaning, meanings often not in harmony with one another. Can it retain its place as foundational to all human relations, including markets?

Table of Contents
President's Message
From 1818 R Street NW

By Bridget Puzon

FEATURED TOPIC

By Grant Cornwell and Eve Stoddard
Liberal arts education has both economic and educational meaning, meanings often not in harmony with one another. Can it retain its place as foundational to all human relations, including markets?

By Peter A. Facione
Is there a crisis in liberal education? If there is, why do so many things ring of achievement? There are problems, and solutions point to what finally liberal education means.

By Michele Tolela Myers
The goals a society sets for the next generation are those of a parent, writ large.

By Raymond Lou and Karen L. Mendonca
In educating large numbers of first-generation college students, public state universities set a standard of liberal arts education as a goal. Achieving that goal requires a model of liberal with professional education. The California system provides a model for developing such a holistic education.

By Andrea Leskes
The National Panel of Greater Expectations is engaged in articulating the aims and purposes of undergraduate education for students of the twenty-first century. In an interview, the Director of the project explains the context for this initiative.

Perspectives

By Martha Nussbaum
The "capabilities approach" asserts the needs of human beings for a range of human activities as the basis of what development might deliver to people.

By Judith Ramaley
Lessons learned--from start-up through implementation--at the University of Vermont as it promoted the use of technology for enhancing learning, serving on-campus students, and extending professional education beyond the campus.

My View

By Kathleen Boone
Electronic communication, a hybrid of both speech and writing, leads to questions--some based on mixed experiences--about the similarities and differences among these forms.

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