Peer Review

Peer Review, Winter/Spring 2016 - Transparency and Problem-Centered Learning
Winter/Spring 2016

This issue, funded by TG Philanthropy, explores the relationship between high-impact practices and underserved student success. The articles address what faculty can do to redesign courses to achieve transparency in student learning and embed effective practices, such as a problem-centered curriculum, to foster underserved student development and success in college.

Peer Review, Fall 2015
Fall 2015

Sponsored by The Kresge Foundation, this issue focuses on campus, state, regional, and national strategies for “Advancing Roadmaps for Community College Leadership to Improve Student Learning and Success.” Leaders from Jobs for the Future, Achieving the Dream, the John N. Gardner Institute for Excellence in Undergraduate Education,  the American Association of Community Colleges, and the Council on Undergraduate Research contributed to the issue and AAC&U Roadmap Project colleges collaborated across institutions to write articles that highlight emerging practices for improving student learning and success based on the LEAP framework.

Peer Review, Summer 2015 - Rethinking Preparation for Work: A Civic-Enriched Liberal Education
Summer 2015

In a world where college graduates spend the majority of their public lives engaged in work, this issue of Peer Review, sponsored by the Kettering Foundation, focuses on how colleges might reconceive preparation for work in addition to preparation for citizenship. Instead of making the case for civic learning only by noting that civic education skills also are useful in getting a job, this issue explores whether there is a more expansive and civic notion of work to which higher education might contribute.

Peer Review, Spring 2015
Spring 2015

This issue, sponsored by the W. M. Keck Foundation as part of the PKAL Guide to Systemic Institutional Change in STEM Education project, features case studies by institutions that developed and field tested a comprehensive institutional model for facilitating strategic change in STEM education. The model takes a scientific approach and provides both a process and content scaffold for campus leaders to facilitate change efforts. It offers leadership, planning, assessment, and practical tools for developing a strategic plan for change, including evidence-based practices. The model also provides a “readiness” tool for assessing the capacity for change in terms of faculty expertise, resources, and campus infrastructure as well as a rubric for monitoring progress. Although the model was developed for STEM specifically, it can be adapted to other institutional change projects more broadly or outside the STEM disciplines.

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