Integrative Learning Publications

Peer Review, Fall 2008
Peer Review, Fall 2008

Peer Review, Fall, 2008: Intentionality and integrative learning, captured in the LEAP vision of essential learning outcomes, have been themes in AAC&U work for decades. This issue features articles about institutions that are aligning institutional practices with educational goals, making clear to students what the important outcomes of college are, and developing opportunities for them to integrate and apply what they are learning.

The Fall 2008 issue of Peer Review has sold out. Articles are available online and the full issue is available as a PDF.

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Purposeful Pathways: Helping Students Achieve Key Learning Outcomes
2006

This final publication of the Greater Expectations project reports on practices from high school through college to advance four selected liberal education outcomes: inquiry, civic, global, and integrative learning. From defining outcomes, to reviewing current practices, to charting sequences of learning over time, readers will find numerous resources helpful in their curricular planning.

Peer Review, Summer/Fall 2005

The Summer/Fall 2005 issue of Peer Review focuses on integrative learning. Integrative abilities are among the most important goals of a twenty-first-century liberal education. Articles in this issue explore how integrative learning fosters connections among disciplines and cocurricular experiences and transcends academic boundaries.

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Integrative Learning: Mapping the Terrain
2005

Published by AAC&U and the Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching, this paper explores the challenges to integrative learning today as well as its longer tradition and rationale within a vision of liberal education. In outlining promising directions for campus work, the authors draw on AAC&U's landmark report, Greater Expectations, as well as the Carnegie Foundation's long-standing initiative on the scholarship of teaching and learning. Readers will find a map of the terrain of integrative learning on which promising new developments in undergraduate education can be cultivated, learned from, and built upon.

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